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The no-dig vegetable garden

I have established a "no-dig" vegetable garden to mitigate the negative impacts of tillage on soil quality. Tillage disrupts soil structure, reducing the levels of organic matter and depleting populations of beneficial microorganisms, such as mycorrhizae. These microorganisms are crucial for plant health as they enhance water and mineral uptake.

To implement this method, I employed the sheet-mulch, or 'lasagna-method'. This involved placing a 15 cm deep layer of compost directly onto the existing vegetation, including grass and herbaceous plants, to form the garden beds. For the garden paths between these beds, I applied a layer of wood chips. This approach effectively suppresses the majority of weeds, conserves soil moisture, and enhances carbon sequestration, thus contributing to overall soil health and sustainability.

I later applied this "no-dig" gardening method in various other projects, finding it particularly effective for small-scale operations. The success of this method across different sites has demonstrated its versatility and efficiency in enhancing soil health and productivity. Its benefits, such as weed suppression, water retention, and improved soil structure, have consistently proven valuable in diverse agricultural settings.

I produce the following fruits & vegetables :

tomatoes

eggplants

zucchini

butternut

spinach

radish

salad

arugula

carrots

beets

potatoes

basil

parsley

bell peppers

strawberries

raspberries

asparagus

green beans

kale

broccoli

legumes bio corse maraìchage
legumes bio corse
legumes bio corse
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